Wednesday, June 18, 2014 – Researchers from the University of Calgary and Canadian Museum of Nature meticulously examined teeth from 16 different Alberta dinosaur species from 3 different clades: Ankylosauria, Ceratopsidae, and Hadrosauridae, in an excellent new study recently published in PLOS ONE. Hundreds of teeth were studied from 76 individual dinosaurs from Alberta’s Dinosaur Park Formation.

The research suggests that six different Alberta megaherbivores (two ceratopsian, two ankylosaur, and two hadrosaur) successfully shared their habitat with one another by selecting flora from different heights, and of different types, than their herbivorous-brethern.

Picture ceratopsians eating tough plants in the lower flora levels, ankylosaurs eating soft plants from the same lower levels, and hadrosaurs towering above the ceratopsians and the ankylosaurs to munch on all the leaves, fruits, seeds, and twigs they can reach!

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Alberta Herbivores Shared, Feasted on Different Flora - Ankylosaur Teeth

Ankylosaur Teeth – Source: The Functional and Palaeoecological Implications of Tooth Morphology and Wear for the Megaherbivorous Dinosaurs from the Dinosaur Park Formation (Upper Campanian) of Alberta, Canada

Alberta Herbivores Shared, Feasted on Different Flora - Ceratopsid Teeth

Ceratopsid Teeth – Source: The Functional and Palaeoecological Implications of Tooth Morphology and Wear for the Megaherbivorous Dinosaurs from the Dinosaur Park Formation (Upper Campanian) of Alberta, Canada

Alberta Herbivores Shared, Feasted on Different Flora - Hadrosaurid Teeth

Hadrosaurid Teeth – Source: The Functional and Palaeoecological Implications of Tooth Morphology and Wear for the Megaherbivorous Dinosaurs from the Dinosaur Park Formation (Upper Campanian) of Alberta, Canada